A Dangerous Figure: Young and Unemployed in the UK

Imagine if all the anger and frustration of the UK young unemployed were channeled into a single powerful entity. A Dangerous Figure is a collective icon, a machine with the ability to unite all young unemployed people in the UK into a single ambassador, a face that represents their combined potential, hopes and fears. The journey leading to A Dangerous Figure begins as an online form, much like a job application, but instead of meeting with rejection or silence, these forms convert the statistics back into the humanity they represent. What would you ask them?What would they tell you? Participate at: http://www.adangerousfigure.co.uk/

Imagine if all the potential and all the anger of the UK young unemployed was channelled into a single powerful and Dangerous Figure. A Dangerous Figure is an online platform, travelling exhibition and graphic novel which merges user-generated content into the "everyman" UK young unemployed. This serves as an ambassador for their cause, made by them, and representing them with a merged face and set of statistic which form an open letter. Initially an exhibition at Somerset House, O2 Telefonica part funded.
 
 
On the 28th of January 2014 A Dangerous Figure was officially registered in The National Portrait Gallery's public archive. We are very proud to be Nationally recorded on the Contemporary Artist files, and for our work to become a learning resource for anyone researching British portraiture from the 16th Century till present day.
 
젋은 청년 취업준비생들의 절망감, 불안감, 희망이 하나로 합쳐져 하나의 커다른 파워풀한 이미지를 만들어 낸다고 생각해보자. A Dangerous Figure는 취업준비생들의 참여를 이끄는 인터넷 웹사이트, 그들의 얼굴을 모아 프로그래밍을 통해 만들어낸 얼굴이미지, 이력서를 모아 만든 설치작품, 그들과 인터뷰를 통해 만들어낸 일러스트 아트북으로 이루어져 있다. 2013년 7월 런던 섬머셋 하우스에서 전시된 작품이다.
Tens of thousands of young unemployed from the UK have already added their details and face photo to the constantly-developing average.

An algorithm custom made for this project averages together a random subset of images taken from a database of thousands of faces. The images in the subset are swapped out at random, which creates the animation effect. Due to the nature of the algorithm the sequence is constantly changing, and never repeats.

 
On entering Somerset House (Lightwells entrance), the visitor is confronted with a computerised stand on which visitors can participate in the content of the project. Young unemployed can add their details and face image, and general public can browse the information and add more questions to the survey.
According to Government statistics there are now over a million young unemployed in the UK. The symbol of the project - 1 of 1m - is also the boundary box when photographing your face on the App
On entering the gallery space the visitor is overwhelmed by literally thousands of real rejected job applications from young unemployed. At the end of the space is the user-generated and monumental face of the young unemployed participants. This is constantly shifting as more images are uploaded.
A Dangerous Graphic Novel is a narrative entirely created from user-generated dialogue from the many interviews playing in the coal-hole rooms.
Each of the 4 coal-hole rooms contains a graphic novel, 2 chairs which face each other like a kind of interview room, and audio of many young unemployed people talking about their situation.
The Graphic Novel aims to empower the young unemployed reader with information about their legal rights in the workplace, and warn off employers who seek to abuse young people desperate for work experience.
Visitors are able to get close-up to the individual CVs and read through these genuine documents
Diagram: Explanation of how online participation creates the exhibition environment
Diagram: Explanation of the project symbol, the boundary box for taking a photograph / 1 young unemployed of 1 million UK young unemployed
The Team:
Jack Greenhalgh - Computer Vision Engineer
Owen Lee - Graphics Consultant
Isaac Liddle - Creative writer
Laura Plado - Interior Architect
Danijel Rusovan - Architect
Alex Schnell - Interior Architect
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